Pay What You Wish Day At Johnson House Historic Site

Pay What You Wish Day At Johnson House Historic Site
June 25th, 2022 | 12:00 pm - 4:00 pm
6306 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19144

Johnson House Historic Site, Inc. is one of Philadelphia’s few accessible, intact historic sites and stops on the Underground Railroad open for tours. During the 19th century, and for several generations beyond, the Johnson House was owned by a family of Quaker abolitionists who worked with other European Americans, and African Americans — free and enslaved – to secure safe passage to freedom along the extensive network of clandestine routes and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. When visiting, you will acquire an understanding of the audacious men and women who labored for the freedom of others and gain an appreciation for the courageous decisions made by enslaved Africans to embark on a perilous, hope-filled journey to freedom.

As Quakers, the abolitionist Johnsons believed in non-violence.  They were “infidel practitioners” and advocates of racial equality. Their home was a refuge and safe place for enslaved Africans seeking their way to freedom. The Underground Railroad was a dramatic and effective form of radical protest against a system to enslave Africans for economic profit and to maintain slavery. 

2022-06-25 2022-06-25 America/New_York Pay What You Wish Day At Johnson House Historic Site Pay What You Wish Day At Johnson House Historic Site on June 25, 2022 @ 12:00 am --- Johnson House Historic Site, Inc. is one of Philadelphia’s few accessible, intact historic sites and stops on the Underground Railroad open for tours. During the 19th century, and for several generations beyond, the Johnson House was owned by a family of Quaker abolitionists who worked with other European Americans, and African Americans — free and enslaved – to secure safe passage to freedom along the extensive network of clandestine routes and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. When visiting, you will acquire an understanding of the audacious men and women who labored for the freedom of others and gain an appreciation for the courageous decisions made by enslaved Africans to embark on a perilous, hope-filled journey to freedom. As Quakers, the abolitionist Johnsons believed in non-violence.  They were “infidel practitioners” and advocates of racial equality. Their home was a refuge and safe place for enslaved Africans seeking their way to freedom. The Underground Railroad was a dramatic and effective form of radical protest against a system to enslave Africans for economic profit and to maintain slavery.  --- 6306 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19144 --- --- https://welcomeamerica.com 6306 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19144